Invocation, Evocation and Ceremony with Alan Schacher

Invocation, Evocation and Ceremony with Alan Schacher

In this semi-ritual /semi-performance workshop Alan will lead participants through a process of group invocation, where all participants will simultaneously invite and invoke a deceased relative, significant other or friend, to become present to a gathering within the room.  In other words the room will become doubled, populated with the living and the imagined spirits.

Deep Listening with Annette Tesoriero

Deep Listening with Annette Tesoriero

Deep listening is a term that Aboriginal elder Miriam Rose Ungunmer Bauman uses to translate “Dadirri”. She says: “To know me is to breathe with me. To breathe with me is to listen deeply. To listen deeply is to connect.  It is the sound of deep calling to deep.  Dadirri is the deep inner spring inside us.  We call on it and it calls on us.”  

This workshop will explore deep listening in relation to breath, sound and voice. Each of our bodies has an internal resonance that informs how we listen and how we live. If our lives were a song that were improvised minute by minute, how can deep listening take our final improvisation, that of our death, to a place of integrity? 

Yoga with Savasana Mind with Akhila Hughes

Yoga with Savasana Mind with Akhila Hughes

This yoga class will begin with Savasana with the aim of developing a Savasana mind and taking that deep relaxation through the class. Intensity is often seen as fast and physically difficult and more exciting than slowing down and really feeling what is happening – in our mind, in our body. But intensity can be tender, it can be instinctive and intuitive, it can be spacious and slow.

20th Century Poetry and Philosophy with Peter Banki, Ph.D

20th Century Poetry and Philosophy with Peter Banki, Ph.D

In this workshop we are going to depart by reading Rainer Maria Rilke’s last unfinished poem: “Come you, you last one” and Maurice Blanchot’s very short novel “The Instant of my Death”, which recounts an ecstatic experience of death at the hands of the Nazis at the end of World War II. These will open the space for a discussion of four of the most influential theses on death and dying in twentieth century Western philosophy: